June 09, 2006

Bridge Lines

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Countdown 1 and 2, @ 36x36, 2005

Having mentioned a local bridge and how it's lines found their way into my paintings (during my formative abstract years,) I thought I'd post a couple of recent examples and show how those lines still sneak into my compositions. As I uploaded these paintings, I noticed the torii structure is evident as well, though that might be considered a stretch.

Ruled lines have long been a featured part of my compositions... the paintings don't seem finished without them. They are sometimes buried under opaque or glazed paint, often reapplied and don't always follow color changes. What the digitals don't show are random graphite lines which are equally important. They are often applied as the painting nears completion... a ritual of scribbling on finished work that I'm not sure I understand, but may have something to do with showing it who's boss. The explanation I give my galleries is that the random marks represent energy... and that's probably closer to true.

5 comments:

Ed Maskevich said...

I just found your blog and this is gorgeous work. The work is clean and strong. I am guessing that Richard Diebenkorn must have been a bit of an influence but the strength of your colors go beyond his Ocean Park Series.

Ed Maskevich said...
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KJ said...

Give that man a golden lollypop! Combine Diebenkorn's influence with Rothko's simplicity, toss in a lot of fooling around and this is what ya get! Glad you like the work, thanks for saying so.

Jacie said...

Actually I like these better than Rothko's! The colors are rich and dense and they have a very intriguing composition. I can really see the 'bridging' structure and the graphite lines, now that I know to look for them. Very interesting that you do that.

I find by the time I have pulled my hair out for days and sometimes weeks working on a painting - it is quite a final release to get gestural with some unruly lines. Perhaps, it is to show the painting who is boss and clinch it by the necktie and say "I've got control of this now, sucker". I love lines! And hey thanks for putting me in your links, so cool!

KJ said...

Oh, yeah... you know the feeling too. I should list Twombley as an influence. He made scribbling an artform and in a happy way.